Friday, 27 April 2018

Pros and cons of using a VPN

Pros and cons of using a VPN

The benefit of using a secure VPN is it ensures the appropriate level of security to the connected systems when the underlying network infrastructure alone cannot provide it. The justification for using VPN access instead of a private network usually boils down to cost and feasibility: It is either not feasible to have a private network — e.g., for a traveling sales rep — or it is too costly to do so.

VPN performance can be affected by a variety of factors, among them the speed of users’ internet connections, the types of protocols an internet service provider may use and the type of encryption the VPN uses. Performance can also be affected by poor quality of service and conditions that are outside the control of IT.

 


VPN protocols
There are several different protocols used to secure and encrypt users and corporate data:

IP security (IPsec)
Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) and Transport Layer Security (TLS)
Point-To-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP)
Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol (L2TP)
OpenVPN

 

The most common types of VPNs are remote-access VPNs and site-to-site VPNs.
Remote-access VPN
A remote-access VPN uses a public telecommunication infrastructure like the internet to provide remote users secure access to their organization’s network. This is especially important when employees are using a public Wi-Fi hotspot or other avenues to use the internet and connect into their corporate network. A VPN client on the remote user’s computer or mobile device connects to a VPN gateway on the organization’s network. The gateway typically requires the device to authenticate its identity. Then, it creates a network link back to the device that allows it to reach internal network resources — e.g., file servers, printers and intranets — as though it was on that network locally.

A remote-access VPN usually relies on either IPsec or Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) to secure the connection, although SSL VPNs are often focused on supplying secure access to a single application, rather than to the entire internal network. Some VPNs provide Layer 2 access to the target network; these require a tunneling protocol like PPTP or L2TP running across the base IPsec connection.


Site-to-site VPN
A site-to-site VPN uses a gateway device to connect the entire network in one location to the network in another — usually a small branch connecting to a data center. End-node devices in the remote location do not need VPN clients because the gateway handles the connection. Most site-to-site VPNs connecting over the internet use IPsec. It is also common to use carrier MPLS clouds, rather than the public internet, as the transport for site-to-site VPNs. Here, too, it is possible to have either Layer 3 connectivity (MPLS IP VPN) or Layer 2 (Virtual Private LAN Service, or VPLS) running across the base transport.

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